#ThursdayIdeas | Atlanta BeltLine Partnership, ACSS, Atlanta Mission

September 03, 2015
| by Editor |

Our #ThursdayIdeas blog series continues with three of the featured nonprofits from our just-published annual IDEAS issue of Georgia Nonprofit NOW.

A neighborhood-centered blueprint for collective impact

On November 12, 2014, a crowd of BeltLine supporters, including Mayor Kasim Reed, broke ground on the Westside Trail, the next phase of the city’s signature urban development program. As work gets underway trans forming the three-mile stretch of disused railroad line into a multi-use walking, biking, and public transport corridor, the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership is equally busy with plans to transform the 10 historic neighborhoods surrounding it.

Since early this year, the Partnership (the BeltLine’s “gateway to the nonprofit world”) has been developing a Westside Trail Corridor Partnership Plan to address neighborhood challenges and empower residents to take advantage of everything the BeltLine brings with it. Plans for tackling area issues—health, workforce development, affordable housing, historic preservation—will benefit from lessons learned developing Eastside Trail partnerships. At the same time, said Partnership ED Chuck Meadows, “the fabric and history of the neighborhoods along the Westside Trail are different than those in the Eastside Trail corridor."

For that reason, the Westside plan includes a nine-step process that involves forming a community leadership team, assessing needs, identifying resources already on-hand, and developing ways to fill gaps, align providers, and measure progress. With a complete strategy in hand, the Partnership will issue a request for partners and serve, like they have on the Eastside Trail, as the “backbone organization” for what Meadows calls a formal "collective impact" initiative: “The Partnership is ideally positioned to convene and align partners and drive towards specific, data-driven goals.”

 

Ending homelessness one job at a time

Every month, a group of men and women graduate from the cornerstone program of the Atlanta Center for Self-Sufficiency (ACSS) with the skills and resources to find and succeed in a job, and leave homelessness behind for good. Since launching in 2010, ACSS has helped 1,300 formerly homeless Atlantans attain fulltime employment, largely through their three-week CareerWorks program, providing employment readiness training, work clothes, and assistance with transportation and housing.

"Our employment partners frequently tell us that our clients submit great résumés, are well-prepared for interviews, and, once hired, are hard workers," said ACSS President Dana Johnson. Seventy percent of CareerWorks graduates find full-time employment, and 75 percent still have them six months later. Even better: Their average starting wage is $9.41, outdoing the national minimum wage by 30 percent.

Looking to expand the program's success, ACSS is currently livestreaming one week of their curriculum online to four partnering agencies, with plans to sign six more in the near future. At full scale, said Johnson, the new CareerWorks Access initiative will increase capacity by over 200 percent.

 

A new team effort to empower the homeless

To develop the next generation of services that “end homelessness, one person at a time,” Atlanta Mission launched a Services Design Team tasked with discovering and implementing the best methods for supporting homeless Atlantans physically, emotionally, spiritually, socially, and vocationally.

Services Design Manager Leize Marie Davis said that, while uniting organization leaders working in different departments and five campus locations, the 18-monthold design team has used brainstorming and dialogue to develop specific, measurable targets for their clients, then identify the staff and partner resources needed to meet them. In a process called "shared implementation," team members take approved designs back to their home bases, where they help staff introduce new services organization-wide.

Among other innovations, said Davis, the team has developed "new day services models for clients" and more thorough assessments. It's also helped them build stronger relationships, understand individual needs, and better assist clients for "the next steps in their life transformation.”

 

- See more at: http://www.gcn.org/articles/IDEAS-2015-Nonprofit-Innovation-at-Work-in-G...

A neighborhood-centered blueprint for collective impact

On November 12, 2014, a crowd of BeltLine supporters, including Mayor Kasim Reed, broke ground on the Westside Trail, the next phase of the city’s signature urban development program. As work gets underway trans forming the three-mile stretch of disused railroad line into a multi-use walking, biking, and public transport corridor, the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership is equally busy with plans to transform the 10 historic neighborhoods surrounding it.

Since early this year, the Partnership (the BeltLine’s “gateway to the nonprofit world”) has been developing a Westside Trail Corridor Partnership Plan to address neighborhood challenges and empower residents to take advantage of everything the BeltLine brings with it. Plans for tackling area issues—health, workforce development, affordable housing, historic preservation—will benefit from lessons learned developing Eastside Trail partnerships. At the same time, said Partnership ED Chuck Meadows, “the fabric and history of the neighborhoods along the Westside Trail are different than those in the Eastside Trail corridor."

For that reason, the Westside plan includes a nine-step process that involves forming a community leadership team, assessing needs, identifying resources already on-hand, and developing ways to fill gaps, align providers, and measure progress. With a complete strategy in hand, the Partnership will issue a request for partners and serve, like they have on the Eastside Trail, as the “backbone organization” for what Meadows calls a formal "collective impact" initiative: “The Partnership is ideally positioned to convene and align partners and drive towards specific, data-driven goals.”

 

Ending homelessness one job at a time

Every month, a group of men and women graduate from the cornerstone program of the Atlanta Center for Self-Sufficiency (ACSS) with the skills and resources to find and succeed in a job, and leave homelessness behind for good. Since launching in 2010, ACSS has helped 1,300 formerly homeless Atlantans attain fulltime employment, largely through their three-week CareerWorks program, providing employment readiness training, work clothes, and assistance with transportation and housing.

"Our employment partners frequently tell us that our clients submit great résumés, are well-prepared for interviews, and, once hired, are hard workers," said ACSS President Dana Johnson. Seventy percent of CareerWorks graduates find full-time employment, and 75 percent still have them six months later. Even better: Their average starting wage is $9.41, outdoing the national minimum wage by 30 percent.

Looking to expand the program's success, ACSS is currently livestreaming one week of their curriculum online to four partnering agencies, with plans to sign six more in the near future. At full scale, said Johnson, the new CareerWorks Access initiative will increase capacity by over 200 percent.

 

A new team effort to empower the homeless

To develop the next generation of services that “end homelessness, one person at a time,” Atlanta Mission launched a Services Design Team tasked with discovering and implementing the best methods for supporting homeless Atlantans physically, emotionally, spiritually, socially, and vocationally.

Services Design Manager Leize Marie Davis said that, while uniting organization leaders working in different departments and five campus locations, the 18-monthold design team has used brainstorming and dialogue to develop specific, measurable targets for their clients, then identify the staff and partner resources needed to meet them. In a process called "shared implementation," team members take approved designs back to their home bases, where they help staff introduce new services organization-wide.

Among other innovations, said Davis, the team has developed "new day services models for clients" and more thorough assessments. It's also helped them build stronger relationships, understand individual needs, and better assist clients for "the next steps in their life transformation.”

 

- See more at: http://www.gcn.org/articles/IDEAS-2015-Nonprofit-Innovation-at-Work-in-G...

A neighborhood-centered blueprint for collective impact

On November 12, 2014, a crowd of BeltLine supporters, including Mayor Kasim Reed, broke ground on the Westside Trail, the next phase of the city’s signature urban development program. As work gets underway trans forming the three-mile stretch of disused railroad line into a multi-use walking, biking, and public transport corridor, the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership is equally busy with plans to transform the 10 historic neighborhoods surrounding it.

Since early this year, the Partnership (the BeltLine’s “gateway to the nonprofit world”) has been developing a Westside Trail Corridor Partnership Plan to address neighborhood challenges and empower residents to take advantage of everything the BeltLine brings with it. Plans for tackling area issues—health, workforce development, affordable housing, historic preservation—will benefit from lessons learned developing Eastside Trail partnerships. At the same time, said Partnership ED Chuck Meadows, “the fabric and history of the neighborhoods along the Westside Trail are different than those in the Eastside Trail corridor."

- See more at: http://www.gcn.org/articles/IDEAS-2015-Nonprofit-Innovation-at-Work-in-G...

Atlanta BeltLine Partnership:
A neighborhood-centered blueprint for collective impact

On November 12, 2014, a crowd of BeltLine supporters, including Mayor Kasim Reed, broke ground on the Westside Trail, the next phase of the city’s signature urban development program. As work gets underway trans forming the three-mile stretch of disused railroad line into a multi-use walking, biking, and public transport corridor, the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership is equally busy with plans to transform the 10 historic neighborhoods surrounding it.

Since early this year, the Partnership (the BeltLine’s “gateway to the nonprofit world”) has been developing a Westside Trail Corridor Partnership Plan to address neighborhood challenges and empower residents to take advantage of everything the BeltLine brings with it. Plans for tackling area issues—health, workforce development, affordable housing, historic preservation—will benefit from lessons learned developing Eastside Trail partnerships. At the same time, said Partnership ED Chuck Meadows, “the fabric and history of the neighborhoods along the Westside Trail are different than those in the Eastside Trail corridor."

For that reason, the Westside plan includes a nine-step process that involves forming a community leadership team, assessing needs, identifying resources already on-hand, and developing ways to fill gaps, align providers, and measure progress. With a complete strategy in hand, the Partnership will issue a request for partners and serve, like they have on the Eastside Trail, as the “backbone organization” for what Meadows calls a formal "collective impact" initiative: “The Partnership is ideally positioned to convene and align partners and drive towards specific, data-driven goals.”

Atlanta Center for Self-Sufficiency:
Ending homelessness one job at a time

Every month, a group of men and women graduate from the cornerstone program of the Atlanta Center for Self-Sufficiency (ACSS) with the skills and resources to find and succeed in a job, and leave homelessness behind for good. Since launching in 2010, ACSS has helped 1,300 formerly homeless Atlantans attain fulltime employment, largely through their three-week CareerWorks program, providing employment readiness training, work clothes, and assistance with transportation and housing.

"Our employment partners frequently tell us that our clients submit great résumés, are well-prepared for interviews, and, once hired, are hard workers," said ACSS President Dana Johnson. Seventy percent of CareerWorks graduates find full-time employment, and 75 percent still have them six months later. Even better: Their average starting wage is $9.41, outdoing the national minimum wage by 30 percent.

Looking to expand the program's success, ACSS is currently livestreaming one week of their curriculum online to four partnering agencies, with plans to sign six more in the near future. At full scale, said Johnson, the new CareerWorks Access initiative will increase capacity by over 200 percent.

Atlanta Mission:
A new team effort to empower the homeless

To develop the next generation of services that “end homelessness, one person at a time,” Atlanta Mission launched a Services Design Team tasked with discovering and implementing the best methods for supporting homeless Atlantans physically, emotionally, spiritually, socially, and vocationally.

Services Design Manager Leize Marie Davis said that, while uniting organization leaders working in different departments and five campus locations, the 18-monthold design team has used brainstorming and dialogue to develop specific, measurable targets for their clients, then identify the staff and partner resources needed to meet them. In a process called "shared implementation," team members take approved designs back to their home bases, where they help staff introduce new services organization-wide.

Among other innovations, said Davis, the team has developed "new day services models for clients" and more thorough assessments. It's also helped them build stronger relationships, understand individual needs, and better assist clients for "the next steps in their life transformation.”

Share these ideas on social media using the share buttons below. On twitter, be sure to mention @AtlantaBeltline, @AtlantaCSS, @ATLmission, and @GAnonprofits and use the hashtag #ThursdayIdeas.

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