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Kanter’s Strategies for Giving Day Success, Part 1

Beth Kanter, a much-in-demand trainer, has over 30 years working in the nonprofit sector in technology, training, capacity building, evaluation, fundraising, and marketing. She is currently working with the Knight Foundation to design and facilitate a Peer Learning Exchange with Community Foundation Partners on hosting Giving Days.

has over 30 years working in the nonprofit sector in technology, training, capacity building, evaluation, fundraising, and marketing. - See more at: http://www.bethkanter.org/about-beth/#sthash.QUl7Hs8i.dpuf

When you marry tried-and-true fundraising techniques with social media, you can tap into the full power of crowd-funding. Giving day campaigns—like all crowd funding campaigns—are about more than dollars raised. There is also value in growing your network, and deepening your relationship with influential stakeholders by tasking them with running their own online fundraisers. In social media, anyone can become a philanthropist.

Adapted for direct application to your GAgives on #GIvingTuesday campaign, this is part one of our two-part, top-line excerpt of Beth Kanter's blog post on successful crowdfunding and giving day campaigns. To read Part 2, click here.

People: Know the audience—each audience

That's why a successful campaign is based on understanding the people you're targeting, the specific objectives you want to reach, and the social strategies and tools you'll need to motivate supporters and achieve goals.

Who do you want to reach? Would you describe them as seniors or Millennials or another age group? Are you engaging everyone, or a select group? Maybe you want to use your giving day campaign to cultivate a new donor segment.

Most nonprofits count on a number of diverse audiences. Because resources are always limited, it’s best to understand how each group could benefit your campaign, and prioritize your target audiences accordingly. Start thinking about the supporters who make up your inner circle, who could help you fundraise as your online champions.

Objectives: Identify results, metrics, and “mini goals.”

Campaigns are more successful with:

  • Clear objectives: You've designated a specific project or need.
  • A countdown: Time-based campaigns create a sense of urgency.
  • Matching incentives: Securing a larger donation from an existing champion makes donors feel their money goes further.

You also need to define the metrics you’ll use to measure success:

  • Gather staff and ask them: How do you define success for the organization or program? How do you define failure?
  • Then ask them the same about the campaign.
  • Draw your metrics from those answers: maybe it’s dollars raised, but possibly it’s more complicated. Maybe you’re looking to increase awareness, engagement, or donations from a particular audience.

CauseVox suggests looking at what your mission and programs specifically need to be successful, then breaking that need down into micro-campaigns with their own, more modest goals:

  • Item-Specific: If we can collect X number of items, we’ll get to a specific outcome.
  • Dollar-Specific: We need to raise $X to see this specific outcome.
  • Time-Specific: We need to raise $X by deadline Y to secure a specific outcome.

Don't forget to set donation levels, which help the donor make a decision, and give you an opportunity to market your mini-goals—attaching tangible impact to each giving level.

Social: Inspire donors with compelling stories

What’s the story you’re telling about how the money raised will be used? How do you talk about your organization’s work?

There are many ways to put together a compelling story, but the StartSomeGood Blog has five smart formulas:

The Issue Story talks about the field within which you work and how your project solves a larger social issue.

The Local Story is about a specific local community and how your project serves them.

The People You Serve Story is how people will be transformed through your project.

The Behind the Scenes Story shows how your organization’s target project works and why it is important.

The Innovation Story describes what you’re doing that’s new, unique, or innovative.

Establish a campaign calendar for coordinating story distribution across various channels—the organization web site, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, email, and others. Here are some other ideas for storytelling using social media:

  • Share a simple video of someone who will benefit from the campaign goal telling their story.
  • Host a Twitter chat or Google Hangout with key stakeholders to talk about the what campaign will fund and why it is important.
  • Share photos and mini-stories about people helped by your work over the course of the campaign. These can be coordinated posts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, email or other channels.

To read Part 2, click here

Beth Kanter, a much-in-demand trainer, has over 30 years of experience working in the nonprofit sector in technology, training, capacity building, evaluation, fundraising, and marketing. She is currently working with the Knight Foundation to design and facilitate a Peer Learning Exchange with Community Foundation Partners on hosting Giving Days.

 

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